The following references are inspiration and support for using participation-focused goals and intervention in speech therapy for the adult neurogenic population – and they are the research basis behind the Activity Studio! It’s actually just plain exciting to see that practicing real, meaningful, functional activities in therapy can impact outcomes, patient satisfaction, and motivation! Please feel free to check them out and discuss with your team in order to promote a participation-focused philosophy.

Using Participation-Focused Goals in Speech Therapy

Haley, K., et al. (2019). Collaborative goals for communicative life participation in aphasia: the FOURC model. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.

Womack, Jennifer (2012). The relationship between client-centered goal-setting and treatment outcomes. SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, Vol. 22, 28-35. 

Worrall, L., et al. (2011). What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF. Aphasiology, 25 (3), 309- 322. 

Aphasia Therapy

Armstrong, E. & Mortensen L. (2006). Everyday talk: its role in assessment and treatment for individuals with aphasia. Brain Impairment, 7, 175-189.

Cherney, L., Kaye, R., Lee, J., & van Vuuren, S. (2015). Impact of personal relevance on acquisition and generalization of script training for aphasia: A preliminary analysis. American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, 24(4), 913-22.

Howe, Davidson, Worrall, L, Hersh, et al. (2013). ‘You needed to rehab… families as well’: family members’ own goals for aphasia rehabilitation. International Journal of Language Communication Disorders, 47(5), 511-521.

Kiran, S., & Thompson, C. (2019). Neuroplasticity of language networks in aphasia: advances, updates, and future challenges. Frontiers in Neurology, 2. Retrieved online from: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2019.00295/full 

Stahl, B., Mohr, B., Dreyer, F., Lucchese, G., & Pulvermuller, F. (2016). Using language for social interaction: communication mechanisms promote recovery from chronic, non-fluent aphasia. Cortex, 85(Dec), 90-99.

Torrence, J. M., Baylor, C. R., Yorkston, K. M., & Spencer, K. A.(2016). Addressing communicative participation in treatment planning for adults: A survey of U.S. speech-language pathologists. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 25(3), 355–370. 

Wallace, S., Worrall, L,  Rose, T., Le Dorze, G., Cruice, M., et al. (2017). Which outcomes are most important to people with aphasia and their families? An international nominal group technique study framed within the ICF. Disability Rehabilitation, 39(14), 1364-1379.

Worrall, L., et al. (2011). What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF. Aphasiology, 25 (3), 309-322. 

Ytterberg, C., Kristensen, H.K., Tistad, M., von Koch, L. (2020). Factors related to met needs for rehabilitation 6 years after stroke. PLOS One

Brain Injury

Bogner, J., Dijkers, M., Hade, E, et al. (2019) Contextualized treatment in traumatic brain injury inpatient rehabilitation: effects on outcomes during the first year after discharge. Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, 100(10), 1810-1817.

Marcote, T., & Grant, I. (2010). Neuropsychology of Everyday Functioning. The Guilford Press, NY, NY.

Mattingly, E. (2018). Functional evaluation and treatment in acquired brain injury acute rehabilitation. Perspective of the ASHA Special Interests Group.

Ponsford, J., Bayley, M., Wiseman-Hakes, C., Togher, L., Velikonja, D., McIntyre, A., …Tate, R. (2014). INCOG recommendations for management of cognition following traumatic brain injury.. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Volume 29 (Issue 4), 321-386.

Sohlberg, M., & Turkstra, L. (2011). Optimizing Cognitive Rehabilitation. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Turkstra, Lyn. (2013). Inpatient cognitive rehab: Is it time for a change? Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Mild Cognitive Impairment

Lanzi, A., & Bourgeois, M. (2019). Structured external memory aid treatment for mild cognitive impairment. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1-11.

Magaro, P., Jotter, B., & Balees, M. (2015). Memory training and task specificity in 90-99-year-old seniors with mild cognitive impairment. Advances in Aging Research, 4(1).

McCullough, K. (2014). Mild cognitive impairment: A framework for intervention. Perspectives on gerontology, 19(2), 65-71. 

Smith, G. E., Chandler, M., Fields, J. A., Aakre, J., & Locke, D. E. (2018). A survey of patient and partner outcome and treatment preferences in mild cognitive impairment. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 63(4), 1459–1468. 

Motor Speech

Brady et al. (2012) Dysarthria following stroke – the patient’s perspective on management and rehabilitation. Clinical Rehabilitation, 25, 935-952.

Dykstra, A., Hakel, M., Adams, S. ( 2007). Application of the ICF in reduced speech intelligibility in dysarthria. Seminars in Speech & Language, 28(4), 301-311.

Rosenbek, J. (2017). Mind over motor. The ASHA Leader, 22, (3), 44-49. 

Torrence, J. M., Baylor, C. R., Yorkston, K. M., & Spencer, K. A.(2016). Addressing communicative participation in treatment planning for adults: A survey of U.S. speech-language pathologists. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 25(3), 355–370. 

Yorkston, K., Baylor, C., & Britton, D. (2017) Speech vs speaking: The experiences of people with Parkinson’s Disease and implications for intervention. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 26, 561-568.

System-Level Research & Resources:

American Speech-Language Hearing Association (n.d.) Resources for international classification of functioning, disability, and health. Retrieved online from: https://www.asha.org/slp/icf/

Brummel-Smith, et al. (2016). Person-centered care: A definition and essential elements. Journal of American Geriatrics Society, 64 (1), 15-8. 

Davenport, S., Dickinson, A., & Minns Lowe, C. (2019). Therapy-based exercise from the perspective of adult patients: a qualitative systematic review conducted using an ethnographic approach. Clinical Rehabilitation. doi: 10.1177/0269215519868797

LPAA Project Group (in alphabetical order: Chapey, R., Duchan, J. F., Elman, R. J., Garcia, L. J., Kagan, A., Lyon, J. and Simmons-Mackie, N.),  (2000). Life participation approach to aphasia:  A statement of values for the future.  ASHA Leader,5(3). 4-6. https://leader.pubs.asha.org/doi/full/10.1044/leader.FTR.05032000.4 Reprinted in  R. Chapey (2001) (Ed.). Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders.  (4thed.).  Baltimore:  Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Thompson, C. (2007) Complexity in language learning and treatment. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 16(1), 3-5.

van den Broek, M. D. (2005). Why Does Neurorehabilitation Fail? Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 20(5), 464-473.

World Health Organization. (2007). International classification of functioning, disability, and health: Children & youth version: ICF-CY. Geneva: World Health Organization